Bars In Toronto

PSP is located in California

Bar reviews: Online and newspaper bar reviews are your best tools when trying to quench your thirst in Toronto. Most reviews rate bars by atmosphere, variety of liquor and deals. These independent restaurant reviewers have no one to please but their taste buds! Vibe for the night: In the mood for some pub food to go with your beer selection?

Would you rather enjoy a glass of wine while listening to some live jazz music, or end up dancing the night away at the hottest clubs? Your search for the best bar in Toronto will depend on whether you’re looking for a relaxed atmosphere or something more lively.

  1. Ping Pong Club For Games And Drinking
  2. 96 Tecumeth Street, 647-352-6000
  3. Bar Batavia // 2031 Yonge St
  4. Ballet // 227A Ossington Ave
  5. Victory Cafe (581 Markham Street)
  6. Harbord Street, Toronto, ON M6G 1G7 Canada (map)
  7. Lower Grand River – Dunnville to Port Maitland

Location, location, location: Once you’ve figured out the type of outing you’re in for, think about where you’d like to hit up the town. Places on busy main streets provide the option of bar hopping, while other spots will give you the chance to visit popular parts of the city outside of downtown Toronto.

But the big draw, and the reason the Melody Bar has been written up as one of the best bars in the world, is its weekend karaoke nights, which are great fun even if you think you hate karaoke. It also has CD launches, burlesque shows and a Sunday bluegrass brunch.

Housed in the Gladstone Hotel, which has operated in Toronto’s west end for more than 100 years, the Melody Bar has a style all its own. Situated in the King Edward Hotel, the Consort Bar is reminiscent of a gentlemen’s club. Luckily, ladies are now invited into the old world charm, with cocktails fancy enough to warrant playing dress-up.

Although the prices have inflated, the clientele has remained classy.

Sit perched on a bar stool and intersperse your drinks with some sharing plates, including a pile of nachos substantial enough to call dinner. The King Eddy has a formidable history. A 1961 menu priced the martinis at a mere 90 cents! Although the prices have inflated, the clientele has remained classy. Business deals are still made over drinks and travellers still regale the bartender with their daily stories.

Situated in the King Edward Hotel, the Consort Bar is reminiscent of a gentlemen’s club. Luckily, ladies are now invited into the old world charm, with cocktails fancy enough to warrant playing dress-up. Once upon a time, there was a golden age of railway travel, fine crafted cocktails and well-worn library books.

With the revival of Union Station, perhaps we can return to 1929 glory, the year that The Fairmont Royal York Hotel opened across from Toronto’s main train station. With high-backed plush armchairs, wood-panelled walls and patterned carpeting and drapery reminiscent of Edwardian England, a visit to the hotel’s Library Bar – located just off the opulent lobby – feels like stepping back in time.

Guests can treat themselves to classic cocktails named after Canadian literary heroes like Margaret Atwood and Michael Ondaatje. Sip on a glass of wine from the extensive list, or sample from an impressive selection of whiskies from around the world. Casual meal options are available for lunch and dinner, like the standard expensive hotel club sandwich.

Everybody Dance Now .

Once upon a time, there was a golden age of railway travel, fine crafted cocktails and well-worn library books. Why Go to Any Bar When You Can Drink at Toronto’s Best? Everybody Dance Now . We couldn’t neglect The Drake, one of our favourite Hotel Bars. The Drake is not located in Toronto’s city centre, but it sure feels like it is when you arrive.

We couldn’t neglect The Drake, one of our favourite Hotel Bars. The Drake is not located in Toronto’s city centre, but it sure feels like it is when you arrive. A hub for the fabulous, this revamped space manages to be edgy yet elegant. For more than four decades, The Rex has been Toronto’s go-to for great blues and jazz music.

The venue books around 18 shows every week, with two or three different acts performing each weekday evening, and several weekend shows that start around noon and go through the night. The roster is mostly comprised of local artists, but does include international acts and a smattering of other genres. The vibe here is super casual, with the focus truly on the music.

The food is fresh, but standard pub food, with numerous vegetarian options. Perhaps most importantly, there’s a good selection of draught beer to enjoy with the smooth, smooth jazz. For more than four decades, The Rex has been Toronto’s go-to for great blues and jazz music.

Dw alexander.

Standard